Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Join Us!!!!! Hopscotch Adoptions Family Reunion 2017

It’s time for… Hopscotch’s 2017 Family Reunion!



Hi, Everyone,

The 2017 Hopscotch Reunion is less than seven weeks away.  Now’s the time to register.  Your registration form is attached and due, along with the per person reunion fee, on June 25, 2017.

The fee will cover a pizza party and dessert on Friday night, a catered al fresco breakfast at the park on Saturday morning, the rental of a canopy tent/tables and chairs to keep us shaded and comfortable at the reunion hub, as well as arts/crafts/activities for the children.  Depending on the number of attendees and final costs, the fee may stretch to cover a Sunday morning breakfast as well.

Hopscotch has generously sponsored a catered dinner at the park for Saturday evening.

Additional activities, such as a visit to the water playground at the park, boat/bike rentals, and a trip to the Cincinnati Zoo or other local attractions will be paid by individual families as they go.  If there’s interest to form a group for a Sunday outing, please let me know and I will gladly assist with the planning.

If you are flying to Cincinnati to attend the reunion, your closest airport is CVG.  You can also fly into DAY, SDF or IND.

Please don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions,
Viviane

Viviane Martini, Family Coordinator and Advocate
Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc
Armenia, Bulgaria, Georgia, Ghana, Guyana, Morocco, Serbia and Ukraine
Pre & Post-Adoption Services available to NY and NC residents
Ph: 336.899.0068

This year’s reunion will be hosted at Winton Woods, Cincinnati, Ohio!

A blog about camping at Winton Woods

2017 Family Reunion Registration Form – Register Now (Word Doc)

Sunday, June 11, 2017

3 Reasons Traditional Parenting Doesn’t Work with Kids from Trauma by Mike Berry

Source: http://www.rainbowkids.com

The following article was graciously shared, with permission, by Mike Berry from the blog Confessions of an Adoptive Parent

feat_smIf you’ve parented a child from a traumatic past for any length of time, you already know that traditional parenting techniques do not work. But, have you ever stopped to consider why, or what you could do differently?

Kristin and I both grew up in traditional households, with parents who used traditional techniques in raising us both. There were rules and restrictions, guidelines and boundaries. And if said rules, restrictions, guidelines and boundaries were crossed, BAM, consequences were enforced. No questions asked. From all accounts, these techniques worked. We both grew up to be responsible adults who knew the difference between right and wrong. But, we also never endured significant trauma as children.

Continue reading.

Friday, June 9, 2017

Post Adoption Depression: Causes and Prevention


$20.00 ********FREE TO HOPSCOTCH PLACING CLIENTS!!!!!
Post adoption depression and parent attachment disorder are surprisingly common and seldom talked about. After all, since you’ve tried so hard to become a parent, many adoptive parents are ashamed to admit that they are struggling.

REGISTER NOW

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Books on Toddler and Older Child Adoption for Adoptive Parents

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Source: https://creatingafamily.org


Toddler Adoption
Toddler Adoption: The Weaver’s Craft by Mary Hopkins-Best. Great information. The author was interviewed on the Creating a Family radio show.


adopting-older-children
Adopting Older Children: A Practical Guide to Adopting and Parenting Children Over Age Four by Stephanie Bosco-Ruggiero, MA; Gloria Russo Wassell, MS, LMHC; and Victor Groza, PhD. – This is a wonderful resource full of practical and hopeful tips for parents who have adopted a child over age four from foster care or through international adoption. The adoption therapist authors do not gloss over potential problems, but they don’t exaggerate them either. Listen to our interview with them on the Creating a Family Radio Show- Parenting Older Adopted Kids: A Practical Guide.


Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care
Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections by Deborah N. Silverstein and Susan Livingston Smith – This book is a comprehensive resource on issues facing siblings during foster care or adoption – both biological and adopted.


Our Own: Adopting and Parenting the Older Child
Our Own: Adopting and Parenting the Older Child by Trish Maskew


Adopting the Older Child
Adopting the Older Child by Claudia L. Jewett- Written in 1979 but still relevant.


Adopting a Toddler: What Size Shoe Does She Wear?
Adopting a Toddler: What Size Shoes Does She Wear? by Denise Harris Hoppenhauer – Offers great insight and practical advice for those preparing to adopt a toddler.


Nurturing Adoptions
Nurturing Adoptions – Creating Resilience after Neglect and Trauma by Deborah Gray – Anything by Deborah Gray is great. On our show she said this book was primarily written for adoption professionals, but I think adoptive parents will find a lot of useful information as well.


The Connected Child
The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family by Karyn B. Purvis, David R. Cross, and Wendy Lyons Sunshine


Parenting Your Adopted Older Child
Parenting Your Adopted Older Child By Brenda McCreight – Good overview!


Another Place at the Table
Another Place at the Table by Kathy Harrison – I loved this book. It is the true life tale of one foster family and is very well written. I couldn’t put it down.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

5 Tips for Parenting Harder to Parent Adopted Kids

Source: https://creatingafamily.org
By Dawn Davenport

5-parenting-tips-harder-to-parent-kids

Sometimes parenting feels like we are soaring. Everything is clicking—we get the kids out the door in the morning without a major tantrum and we’re no more than 10 minutes late, we are eating semi-nutritious meals most days, and the little darlings are in bed with a minimum of fuss and teeth more or less brushed most nights.

Then there are times when it feels like we are slugging it out in the trenches. Often it is one particular child that puts us there. Perhaps this child was adopted at an older age after experiencing trauma, or maybe she has brain damage  caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol or drugs, or maybe this child’s temperament is a really poor match for yours. Whatever the reason, some kids are simply more challenging to parent.

When you are in the trenches it’s hard to see a way out. It’s at those times that you need some “quick” tips and tricks to help you cope. Read over these tips every week until you start to climb your way out of the parenting depths.

Read more.